10 Aug 2020

Kaizen Event Week

2020-07-29T22:15:46-04:00August 10th, 2020|Categories: Lean Manufacturing|Tags: , , , , , , , |

Facilitating a successful kaizen event requires a sound plan and reasonable expectations. That way we can keep our team on task and be ready to recognize and address challenges as they arise. To assist in these efforts, the following is a recommended schedule for ensuring kaizen event week success.

3 Aug 2020

Kaizen Event Preparation

2020-08-03T07:31:23-04:00August 3rd, 2020|Categories: Lean Manufacturing|Tags: , , , , , |

Just like any event, adequate preparation is a key factor in kaizen event success. Always be sure to allocate sufficient time to prepare for your kaizen event. That said, it’s best to plan kaizen preparation in addition to your actual kaizen event. Our first tool in this effort is a kaizen timeline...

6 Jul 2020

7 Lean Wastes – Overview

2020-06-11T03:27:17-04:00July 6th, 2020|Categories: Lean Manufacturing|Tags: , , , , |

Most of our time should be spent doing value added work. However, if you take a look at the total lead time through value stream you will discover that “Muda” or waste steals a lot of our time. Another thing that a lot of companies do is to try and reduce the overall lead time by making the value add process more efficient. In reality there’s more value in reducing the waste in the process first before worrying about improving the value added steps.

15 Jun 2020

7 Lean Wastes – Motion

2020-05-27T22:03:02-04:00June 15th, 2020|Categories: Lean Manufacturing|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

In lean, motion refers to any movement of people. The waste of motion is any motion that occurs, which doesn’t add value to the product. Common examples of this in the workplace, include retrieving tools or equipment (including reaching for them), searching for missing information, and exerting effort to lift things from the ground. Any excess motion or effort more than what is required to add value to a product is considered waste.

1 Jun 2020

7 Lean Wastes – Waiting

2020-06-03T21:45:09-04:00June 1st, 2020|Categories: Lean Manufacturing|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

The waste of waiting is any idle time spent by people or machines, when materials or information aren’t immediately available to proceed. In manufacturing, workers may have to wait on equipment such as a forklift to become available or for maintenance to complete if the planned downtime was inaccurate. Unfortunately, overproduction or busy work often obscures waiting

25 May 2020

7 Lean Wastes – Inventory

2020-05-26T21:29:25-04:00May 25th, 2020|Categories: Lean Manufacturing|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

While inventory is often thought of as an asset, being one of the 7 wastes suggests that may be wrong-headed. In fact, as a waste, inventory can actually represent tremendous loss. Not only can inventory cost 40 percent or more of its direct cost to carry, it ties up precious cash that could better be used elsewhere in the business. A simple definition of the waste of inventory is any on-hand material other than what is needed right now to satisfy customer demand. Inventory can be categorized in various ways.

27 Apr 2020

5S Seiketsu (Standardize) and Visual Management

2020-06-24T22:36:00-04:00April 27th, 2020|Categories: Lean Manufacturing, Lean Manufacturing|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The fourth step in the lean 5S (6S) process is seiketsu, or standardized. Standardize is fundamentally about establishing clear, unambiguous norms for people to perform. Standards are a prerequisite for continuous improvement. As Taiichi Ohno, the father of the Toyota Production System (TPS) put it, “Where there is no standard, there can be no improvement.”

20 Apr 2020

5S Seiso (Sweep)

2020-06-24T22:37:38-04:00April 20th, 2020|Categories: Lean Manufacturing|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

Seiso is the third step the lean 5S process. Seiso translates from Japanese as “sweep” or “shine”. However, this translation often contributes to the superficial interpretation that sweeping or shining only relates to making areas subjectively clean or hygienic.

23 Mar 2020

Introduction to Lean Concepts

2020-04-15T22:22:33-04:00March 23rd, 2020|Categories: Lean Manufacturing, Supply Chain|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Lean is a collection of operational concepts, frameworks, and approaches for driving continuous improvement in organizations. Lean accompishes this through relentlessly focusing on maximizing customer value while minimizing the 8 wastes, such as inventory.

Fasteners and Class C Component Supply

Falcon supplies fasteners and inventory management services to manufacturers in North and South Carolina, Kentucky, and the surrounding areas.

Charlotte Office

10715 John Price Road
Charlotte, NC 28273

Phone: 800.438.0332

Mobile: 704.588.4740

Mailing Address

P.O. Box 7429 | Charlotte, NC 28241-7429

Phone: 704.588.4740

Fax: 704.588.5753

Kentucky Office

11536 Commonwealth Drive
Louisville, KY 40299

Phone: 502.266.6292

Fax: 502.526.5567