22 Jun 2020

7 Lean Wastes – Transportation

2020-06-18T20:53:32-04:00June 22nd, 2020|Categories: Lean Manufacturing|Tags: , , , , , , , |

By definition this is the movement of materials that adds no value to the product. In most cases, transportation waste is thought of as normal in a manufacturing environment. However, it is also evident in an office environment. For example, walking around to get signatures on documents. The excessive filing also leads to the waste of transportation since those files need to be moved from time to time.

15 Jun 2020

7 Lean Wastes – Motion

2020-05-27T22:03:02-04:00June 15th, 2020|Categories: Lean Manufacturing|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

In lean, motion refers to any movement of people. The waste of motion is any motion that occurs, which doesn’t add value to the product. Common examples of this in the workplace, include retrieving tools or equipment (including reaching for them), searching for missing information, and exerting effort to lift things from the ground. Any excess motion or effort more than what is required to add value to a product is considered waste.

8 Jun 2020

7 Lean Wastes – Over Processing

2020-05-28T19:46:29-04:00June 8th, 2020|Categories: Lean Manufacturing|Tags: , , , , , , , |

Over processing occurs anytime more resources are used than truly needed to satisfy customers. Unfortunately, over-processing is one of the most difficult wastes to accurately identify and assess, making it rampant in many organizations.

25 May 2020

7 Lean Wastes – Inventory

2020-05-26T21:29:25-04:00May 25th, 2020|Categories: Lean Manufacturing|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |

While inventory is often thought of as an asset, being one of the 7 wastes suggests that may be wrong-headed. In fact, as a waste, inventory can actually represent tremendous loss. Not only can inventory cost 40 percent or more of its direct cost to carry, it ties up precious cash that could better be used elsewhere in the business. A simple definition of the waste of inventory is any on-hand material other than what is needed right now to satisfy customer demand. Inventory can be categorized in various ways.

18 May 2020

5S Action Guide

2020-06-24T22:30:45-04:00May 18th, 2020|Categories: Lean Manufacturing|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

It’s important to remember that 5S applies to anyone regardless of profession or industry. If applied properly, 5S will help you in many different aspects. A 5S action guide will help you track everything you plant to improve in your workplace. From beginning to end, this will help you stay on track with your plans and actions you have taken and ensure 5S success.

11 May 2020

5S Skills Matrix

2020-06-24T22:34:17-04:00May 11th, 2020|Categories: Lean Manufacturing|Tags: , , , , , |

The 2 key pillars of any lean enterprise are continuous improvement and respect for people. Knowing and improving your team’s skillsets help your company to overcome the many future challenges of the changing business landscape.

4 May 2020

5S Shitsuke (Sustain)

2020-06-24T22:35:54-04:00May 4th, 2020|Categories: Lean Manufacturing|Tags: , , , , , , , , |

Shitsuke (Sustain), sometimes called self-discipline, is step 5 in the 5S process. In 5S, sustain refers to the commitment and self-discipline to maintain the previous four 5S steps – seiri (sort), seiton (sort), seiso (sweep), and seiketsu (standardize), and is key to continuous improvement success…

27 Apr 2020

5S Seiketsu (Standardize) and Visual Management

2020-06-24T22:36:00-04:00April 27th, 2020|Categories: Lean Manufacturing, Lean Manufacturing|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

The fourth step in the lean 5S (6S) process is seiketsu, or standardized. Standardize is fundamentally about establishing clear, unambiguous norms for people to perform. Standards are a prerequisite for continuous improvement. As Taiichi Ohno, the father of the Toyota Production System (TPS) put it, “Where there is no standard, there can be no improvement.”

Fasteners and Class C Component Supply

Falcon supplies fasteners and inventory management services to manufacturers in North and South Carolina, Kentucky, and the surrounding areas.

Charlotte Office

10715 John Price Road
Charlotte, NC 28273

Phone: 800.438.0332

Mobile: 704.588.4740

Mailing Address

P.O. Box 7429 | Charlotte, NC 28241-7429

Phone: 704.588.4740

Fax: 704.588.5753

Kentucky Office

11536 Commonwealth Drive
Louisville, KY 40299

Phone: 502.266.6292

Fax: 502.526.5567